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The resources listed here include offices, articles, websites, slides, and other sources of information useful to graduate students. Use the search to find what you're looking for.

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Teaching Courses

Many Stanford courses welcome graduate students from a variety of departments and programs. This list of current courses from Explore Courses appears to align with the Teaching domain of the GPD Framework and to be of interest to grad students broadly. Explore the list to find courses of interest to you and be sure to note any restrictions or pre-requisites.

Last modified 11/26/2014

Design Thinking Bootcamp: Experiences in Innovation and Design

This is an immersive introduction to design thinking for all graduate, postdoctoral and professional degree students. Students work in multidisciplinary teams to apply design thinking principles to a range of real world problems. Guest lecturers and coaches enhance the experience with training in team dynamics, storytelling, and project leadership. A full-quarter course that meets three days a week, there is limited enrollment and admission is by application only.

Last modified 08/13/2014

SGSI 2018: Identity in the Classroom

Are you looking for tools and strategies to connect with all of your students, consider how identity affects the experience of instructors and students in all courses and disciplines, and create space for productive disagreements in your classes? The goal of Identity in the Classroom is to combine discussing research and writing on identity in the classroom with creating practical, thoughtful responses to real-world classroom challenges. Students in this course will gain greater confidence addressing issues related to identity and an expanded toolkit of specific teaching strategies for student engagement.

Monday, Sept. 10 – Friday, Sept. 14, 10 AM – 3 PM

(Light breakfast and lunch will be served daily)

Instructor

  • Jennifer Randall Crosby, PhD, psych one coordinator, Department of Psychology

Audience & Capacity

Open to all graduate students in any discipline, as well as postdoctoral fellows, if space allows. Space is limited to 45.

Objectives

By participating fully in this course, you will:

  • Apply relevant research in teaching situations, such as work on stereotype threat, implicit bias, cultural mismatch, and growth and fixed mindset
  • Integrate considerations of student belonging and inclusion into syllabus design, classroom practices, and assessments of student learning
  • Approach difficult classroom conversations and changing social and cultural norms with confidence, openness, and humility

Summary

Student and instructor identity play a role in learning experiences in all disciplines and all spaces (classroom, labs, mentoring, etc.). Even in courses that are not explicitly concerned with topics related to identity, expectations and academic cultures may be structured to make some students feel more welcome than others. Using relevant research and guest experts, we’ll explore how academic learning spaces can be designed to be more inclusive of all students, and how equitable and effective approaches to teaching can be adopted in a variety of settings. The course will be structured around topical discussion with brief readings and a guest speaker each morning, followed by lunch. Guests will include faculty will relevant expertise in the research being discussed, as well as practitioners working directly with students.

Areas of focus:

  • Stereotype Threat and Student Belonging
  • Culture Clashes in Academia
  • Gender Diversity
  • Student Disability and Mental Health
  • Difficult Conversations and Brave Spaces

Afternoons will be focused on applying the morning’s topics to each course participant’s teaching plans and practices. Specifically, participants will consider how the morning’s discussion can inform their syllabus design, choice of course format, activities, assessments, and interactions with students outside of the classroom. In some cases, students may be grouped by discipline to discuss specific issues and challenges in their fields.

Past participants in a graduate learning community who served as a pilot program for this course said the following about their experience:

“Participating in the learning community was one of the most meaningful and impactful professional development experiences of my graduate career. The learning community helped me to see inclusion as a series of ongoing and overlapping practices that I must intentionally employ and continually reevaluate. Now, as I design syllabi or plan assessments, I ask myself, ‘What type of learning space do I want to create? Who is included in this lesson? Who is excluded?’ These central questions, which were a running theme throughout much of the learning community, have served as a pedagogical North Star of sorts, so that no matter the specific strategies, readings, or formats I employ in a given class session, I am able to continually return to the practices that support the learning of all students.”

“I really enjoyed the level of reflection, introspection and space to grapple with difficult ideas. I thought the group was thoughtful and really invested in the topics and I looked forward to the sessions.”

“Hearing the from members of disparate departments, fields, and backgrounds exposed me to new teaching issues and approaches that I had not considered before.”

Additional Course Expectations

  • As part of this course, about 30 min. of work per day outside of class is expected in preparation for the next day's class.
  • Full attendance is expected.

SUNet ID required to log in; all SGSI correspondence sent to your Stanford email account.

Last modified 03/01/2018

Act Accordingly: Career Advice for Students Who Are Starting Out PhDs

As a PhD student, you probably want to start thinking about your career early. This interview with Rick Reis, "Tomorrow's Professor" and highly experienced faculty career consultant, will get you thinking about ways to set yourself up for a faculty career early. Check out this quick read!

Last modified 09/07/2016

SGSI 2018: Flourishing: The Art and Science of a Life Well Lived

What is human flourishing and how do we practice it in an age of hyper-complexity and ever-accelerating pace? You will engage with this issue through research-backed reading, class discussion, and guided practice on the psychological, emotional, and social factors that promote a life well lived. Models of integrated well-being, meditation, deep meaning-making, and social connection are distilled from fields ranging from interpersonal neurobiology and contemplative neuroscience, to positive psychology and applied philosophy. A mix of lecture and guided practice is utilized to help graduate students from a range of disciplines move these ideas from concept to lived experience, thereby leading to a life well lived.

Monday, Sept. 10 – Friday, Sept. 14, 9 AM – 2 PM

(Light breakfast and lunch will be served daily)

Instructors

  • Aneel Chima, PhD, associate director, Health and Human Performance
  • Frederic Luskin, PhD, senior consultant and lecturer, The Stanford Wellness Education Program; founder and director, The Stanford Forgiveness Project

Audience & Capacity

Open to all graduate students in any discipline, as well as postdoctoral fellows, if space allows. Space is limited to 32.

Objectives

By participating fully in this course, you will:

  • Understand the core research-based models of human flourishing and well-being
  • Develop an integrated flourishing toolkit that can be applied in minutes a day with measurable positive effect
  • Apply these mental maps and tools in a structured, yet flexible way to your own life

Summary

What is human flourishing and how do we practice it in an age of hyper-complexity and ever-accelerating pace? You will engage with these two questions by studying, discussing, and applying research on the psychological, emotional, and social factors that promote a life well lived. Models of integrated well-being, meditation, deep-meaning making, and social connection are distilled from fields ranging from interpersonal neurobiology and contemplative neuroscience to positive psychology and applied philosophy.

Any investigation into a concept as rich and diverse as human flourishing necessitates a thoughtful multi-disciplinary approach. As such, graduate students from a wide range of disciplines will find multiple compelling entry points into the investigation of human flourishing. Further, the topic of human flourishing is not amenable to intellectual exploration alone—it must be taken from the abstract into the lived realities of our lives. A mix of lecture and guided practice is utilized to help you move these ideas from concept to lived experience, leading to life transformation.

In sum, we welcome students from all disciplines who are open to exploring ways of thinking that emphasize honest reflection, openness to experience, self awareness, and the courage to act from a space of authenticity. Through a series of hands-on exercises, a range of assessments and lectures + discussions about multiple aspects of flourishing, you can broaden your vision of success and what satisfies you. Additionally, it’s helpful to think of this course less as a traditional class and, instead, more as an applied workshop guided by the following mantra: “Learn, Apply, Transform.”

Learn – Learn the most effective cognitive, emotional, social, and physical strategies that facilitate flourishing and wellness.

Apply – Apply these insights and strategies to your life, your social sphere, and the world around you.

Transform – Transform the way you live and impact the people around you. Live with deeper purpose, enhanced flourishing, greater resilience, and increased lifelong wellness.

Join us on this journey into the heart of human flourishing and how to build a life full of more vitality and well-being.

Past participants who took this course said the following about their experience:

“I believe this class quite radically shifted my life experience.” -SGSI 2017 Participant

“This is the ideal course to take at the beginning of your graduate career to focus on how to approach your time at Stanford in a healthy, values-centered way.” -SGSI 2017 Participant

“This class was extremely helpful to me for getting in touch with what I value, what truly matters to me, and how I can work on prioritizing those things for the rest of my life.” -SGSI 2017 Participant

Additional Course Expectations

  • As part of this course, about 30 to 60 minutes of work per day outside of class is expected to read, write, and reflect on seminar concepts. You will also be expected to do some enjoyable pre-reading before the seminar class begins.
  • Full attendance is expected.

SUNet ID required to log in; all SGSI correspondence sent to your Stanford email account.

Last modified 03/01/2018

Data Management Services

SUL's data management services provide a range of resources to help you securely and conveniently store, access, curate, and preserve your research data. See their website to learn about available options or to schedule a consultation. Open to all graduate students. 

Last modified 08/18/2014

Pursuing Meaningful Work Strategies Guide

BEAM, the Stanford career center, has produced this guide to help you plan ahead as you pursue meaningful work after graduate school. In it, you will find guidance on the academic job search, as well as other career pathways for PhDs. See sample CVs and read examples of strong cover letters. Learn key details of preparing effective job materials to help launch the best career path for you. Don't start your job search before consulting this guide!

Available through BEAM's Digital Resources website.

Last modified 10/23/2016

Designing Courses Backwards

Backward design is a course planning practice that encourages you to work backwards from your learning goals to create an effective and coherent syllabus. This strategy will help clarify your priorities as an instructor and make your course more valuable to students. This Teaching Commons resource can help get you started. 

Last modified 08/11/2016

Technical Communication Courses

Stanford Engineering's Technical Communication Program offers technically-oriented courses on speaking and writing skills to interested students from all disciplines. Check their website for current course offerings and enrollment information. 

Last modified 08/20/2014

Lytics Lab

The Stanford Lytics Lab is an open, interdisciplinary community that advances the science of learning through the use of data and digital technology in college and lifelong learning. The lab group meets weekly and includes faculty, staff, and students from Computer Science, Learning Science, Communication, Psychology, Statistics, Design, Sociology, and other fields. If interested in learning more about this collaborative, interdisciplinary group, check out their website. 

Last modified 02/13/2017

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