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Stanford researchers develop tool to drastically speed up the study of enzymes

A polymer chip
(Image credit: Daniel Mokhtari
Jul 22 2021
Faculty, Fellow, Research, Stanford

For much of human history, animals and plants were perceived to follow a different set of rules than rest of the universe. In the 18th and 19th centuries, this culminated in a belief that living organisms were infused by a non-physical energy or “life force” that allowed them to perform remarkable transformations that couldn’t be explained by conventional chemistry or physics alone.

Scientists now understand that these transformations are powered by enzymes – protein molecules comprised of chains of amino acids that act to speed up, or catalyze, the conversion of one kind of molecule (substrates) into another (products). In so doing, they enable reactions such as digestion and fermentation – and all of the chemical events that happen in every one of our cells – that, left alone, would happen extraordinarily slowly.

“A chemical reaction that would take longer than the lifetime of the universe to happen on its own can occur in seconds with the aid of enzymes,” said Polly Fordyce, an assistant professor of bioengineering and of genetics at Stanford University.

While much is now known about enzymes, including their structures and the chemical groups they use to facilitate reactions, the details surrounding how their forms connect to their functions, and how they pull off their biochemical wizardry with such extraordinary speed and specificity are still not well understood.

A new technique, developed by Fordyce and her colleagues at Stanford and detailed this week in the journal Science, could help change that. Dubbed HT-MEK — short for High-Throughput Microfluidic Enzyme Kinetics — the technique can compress years of work into just a few weeks by enabling thousands of enzyme experiments to be performed simultaneously. “Limits in our ability to do enough experiments have prevented us from truly dissecting and understanding enzymes,” said study co-leader Dan Herschlag, a professor of biochemistry at Stanford’s School of Medicine.

Study co-author, Daniel Mokhtari is a 2019 SIGF Fellow.

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